Botswana

Okavango

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Field research station opens

Field research station opens

EWB office, researchers enjoying their visitors
EWB office, researchers enjoying their visitors
Kelly Landen

Elephants Without Borders is committed to finding answers to challenging conservation issues. Elephants are a key species to understanding the future of Africa’s wildlife and the ecosystems it needs to survive. By connecting elephants, wildlife, people and ecosystems through rigorous and collaborative, multi-disciplinary, long-term conservation research programmes, scientists might begin to make a meaningful difference towards conserving Africa’s biodiversity.

EWB, with support provided by the Paul G. Allen Family Foundation, has opened a new field research station in the middle of a wilderness area. The Conservation Ecology Research Station is located in the sector known as NG26, or the Abu concession, of the Okavango Delta. The station will serve as a ‘living laboratory’, where researchers can advance the knowledge and understanding of elephants and other large herbivores, and investigate the on-going processes that are currently influencing wildlife ecology in the region.

Research projects based at the camp already underway include: investigating the spatial structuring and demography of elephants in a continuously changing environment; thermoregulation and climatic influences on spatial use by elephants; ecology of giraffe and other large herbivores in the delta ecosystem; monitoring elephant reproductive and physiological status; comparing stress levels in captive and wild populations; identifying endogenous elephant herpes viruses; and the behaviour and physiology of elephants introduced into the wild from captivity.

The EWB Research Station will provide opportunities to scientists, research students and different agencies which would not have been previously available to them. Programmes which facilitate greater coordination and synergies between research efforts will develop coherent strategies for more effective wildlife conservation and management.

Read more articles from this issue:
Zambezi Traveller (Issue 13, June 2013)

Read more about the region in our destination guide:
Okavango

From the Zambezi Traveller Directory:
Elephants Without Borders